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Accommodation Types


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Hotel
An establishment providing accommodation, meals, and other services for travellers and tourists, by the night.
Hostel
An establishment which provides inexpensive food and lodging for a specific group of people, such as students, workers, or travellers.
B&B
Sleeping accommodation for a night and a meal in the morning, provided in guest houses and hotels.
Villas
When planning your holidays you have to take into consideration not only the location, but also the best accommodation that will provide you and your party with value for money according to your requirements. If you are looking to get away from it all and relax with your family in privacy, than a holiday villa would be the ideal choice for you.
Vacation Rentals
Many residents of popular tourist destinations lease their houses and apartments to vacationers. The residence may have been bought specifically for this purpose or the normal occupants may vacate it during some parts of the year. The guests will have full use of the residence, usually with utilities included but no servicing or meals.
House Sitting
While traveling many people use house sitting as a form of accommodation. It is free accommodation while you get to live in the comfort of a house. This helps keep the costs of traveling lower than other traditional accommodation types. House sitting involves an agreement between the house sitter and the home owner that the house sitter will occupy a house while the home owner is away.
Resort
A place that is frequented for holidays or recreation or for a particular purpose.
Primitive Campgrounds
Offer no hookups, no flush toilets, and sometimes no purified water. They may or may not have picnic tables. About all you can count on are pit toilets.
Group Tenting Sites
Are large sites for crowds, generally in the open.
Walk-in Sites
Are far enough from the campground parking area that you will need to tote your supplies. In some campgrounds, the walk-in sites are reserved for hikers and bicycle campers.
Wooded Campground
Indicates that the campground is built in a forest, which means a buffer of trees separate the sites, offering more privacy.
Open Campground
Indicates the campground is built in a field, on the beach, or on a meadow of prairie grasses. The view of the countryside or ocean may compensate for the lack of privacy.
Tent Sites
No utilities, allows tent campers only.
Dry Camping/Boondocking
Camping in a recreational vehicle with no hookups and no utilities.
RV Park
Almost always privately owned, caters to overnight or seasonal guests who have recreational vehicles (RVs).
Extended Stay Camp Site
Almost always privately owned, caters for an extended period of time, like a month or a season. Often times, parks that allow extended stays have restrictions against RVs that are more than 5 or 10 years old.
RV Resort Park
Almost always privately owned, caters to overnight or seasonal guests who have recreational vehicles. RV Resort is often an indication of a well developed, higher end park, but since any RV Park can call itself an RV Resort, this is not always the case.
Group Camping Areas
Camping areas at a campground that accommodate larger groups of twenty or more. Typically group camping areas have a fire ring and/or other other central location for group activities.
Chalet
A wooden house with overhanging eaves, typically found in the Swiss Alps.
Holiday Cottages
A holiday cottage is a cottage used for accommodation, which has become common in the United Kingdom and Canada.
Self-catering
Accommodation where you have to cook your own meals.