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Level 4

Competency 4: Critical and Creative Thinking


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critical thinking
"Identifying and challenging assumptions," "Questioning credibility of sources," and "identifying what is relevant and irrelevant," are all examples of what skill?
creative thinking
"Finding unusual solutions," and "Making unique connections between seemingly unrelated things" are characteristics of what skill?
Bloom's taxonomy
A hierarchy of thinking skills (as well as explanations of those skills). The skills, from most basic to most complex, are: knowledge(factual), comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation.
knowledge
In Bloom's taxonomy, the skill associated with remembering, memorizing, and recalling.
comprehension
In Bloom's taxonomy, the skill associated with describing and explaining, grasping the meaning of something, and interpretation.
application
In Bloom's taxonomy, the skill associated with problem solving, and applying information to produce results.
analysis
In Bloom's taxonomy, the skill associated with identifying motives, making inferences, comparing, and breaking something down into parts.
synthesis
In Bloom's taxonomy, the skill associated with creation, recognizing patterns, and making predictions.
evaluation
In Bloom's taxonomy, the skill associated with making value judgements and drawing conclusions.
divergent
In order to promote higher-level thinking, teachers should ask these types of questions.
prompting
In order to encourage students to keep trying, teachers should ask these types of questions.
brainstorming
A teaching strategy where creative thinking is highly encouraged, and criticism of ideas is forbidden.
metacognition
The process of monitoring one's own learning. Understanding the reasons for learning something, and being able to develop a plan for that learning are characteristics of this skill.
KWL chart
This graphic organizer uses three columns: what we know, what we want to know, and what we learned.
story tree
This graphic organizer uses a branch for each major element in a story, and clumps of leaves to represent questions about those elements.
decision tree
This graphic organizer shows actions and their expected consequences.
inductive reasoning
Drawing a conclusion based on one or more examples, or by identifying a pattern or trend. For example, "These ice cubes are cold, therefore all ice cubes are cold."
deductive reasoning
Applying an accepted rule in order to make a conclusion. For example "I know ice is cold, therefore ice cubes must also be cold." Applying a general rule to a specific case.
syllogistic reasoning
A form of deductive reasoning that uses the format: "All dogs are animals, Cocker Spaniels are dogs, therefore Cocker Spaniels are animals."
conditional reasoning
A form of deductive reasoning that uses the format: "If it's poker, it's a card game. Five card draw is poker, therefore it's also a card game."
predict, observe, explain
A three-step strategy for predicting what happen in a given situation. This is helpful for fostering higher-level thinking in students.
scientific inquiry
A five step process used by scientists to gather information about the world we live in. The steps are: 1. Define a problem 2. Research the topic 3. Form a hypothesis 4. Gather evidence 5. Draw conclusions.
cognitive complexity
The level of cognitive demand associated with test items. There are three general levels: high, moderate, and low (based on Webb's depth-of-knowledge levels).
low complexity
According to Webb, the ability to recall, identify, or recognize facts and demonstrate simple skills relates to which level of complexity? (Example: Identify a prime number).
moderate complexity
According to Webb, the ability to demonstrate comprehension and processing of information relates to which level of complexity? (Example: Summarizing a news article).
high complexity
According to Webb, the ability to use abstract reasoning relates to which level of complexity? (Example: drawing a conclusion based on data from a science experiment).